Sharon Anindhita

Designer

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About Sharon Anindhita

Sharon is a resourceful and multifaceted individual who enjoys exploring various disciplines within design including vector illustrations, layout settings, product photography, and branding. With a systematical approach to solving visual communication challenges, she pays great attention to details that results in skillful and meticulous work.

 
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“Design is not powerful, but it is potent. To quote Paul Rand and Philip Kotler, design is indeed “a potent strategic tool that companies can use to gain a sustainable competitive advantage,” which is a perspective that I find interesting.”


One of my design beliefs that I consider the most important is that design communicates an obvious message. For something to be “well designed” it could be simple, or it could be not. It could be considered hideous to some people, but others might understand what it means and might still like it. Simplicity and aesthetics isn’t obligatory, but the most important important thing is that the target audience must be able to easily determine what it is trying to communicate.

For me, the first thing to do is to understanding the brief, compartmentalize it in a way that’s more straightforward for me to work with — like making a list of dos and don’ts

or writing down items I need to finish. Next is to understand the nature of the audience, and for me, the client is also an audience. To understand however, I prefer to discuss with whoever is on the project with me rather than thinking about it alone.

Discussing a topic with more people provides a wider angle and more opinion, so it’s a step closer towards making sure the audience understand what we’re trying to communicate. Otherwise, like what Massimo Vignelli says, "Whatever we do, if not understood, fails to communicate and is wasted effort.”. A design that is unable to fulfil its original intention is therefore not a good design.

 
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Design is not powerful, but it is potent. For me, a substantial part of a good design is an understanding of human psychology. We can design a baby stroller better if we know how parents think and how babies behave, and we can design a poster to better convey our message if we know how our target audience's eyes and brain work.

Knowing this, design has no visible boundaries. It can be applied into every single aspect of human lives and if used strategically, a good design can be the difference between a billion dollar sales or a bankruptcy. To quote Paul Rand and Philip Kotler, design is indeed “a potent strategic tool that companies can use to gain a sustainable competitive advantage,” which is a perspective that I find very interesting.